Der faule Ochse

er meidet alle
Wege zum Reisfeld
er fürchtet das Joch
zieht keinen Pflug
und frisst kein süßes
Gras von der Koppel
Seewind und Nebel
sind ihm genug

 

DSC03183Nationalmuseum Tokio

 

無門慧開 (1183–1260): 懶牛

不經南陌與西阡
犁杷年來怕上肩
棄卻欄中肥嫩艸
綠楊堤畔飽風煙

Wumen Huikai (1183–1260): Lazy Ox

Shunning the south and west paths between the rice paddies,
for over a year refusing to drag the plough with his shoulders,
and giving up the thick and tender fodder in the pen,
it feeds on wind and mist along the willow-shaded embankment.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 83.)

Vergebliches Streben

damals als Junge
beim Spielen am Strand
heute als Graukopf
in Amt und Würden
immer war mir das
Tätigsein wichtig

doch wenn die Hand eilt
kümmert die Seele
Sandburg und Ämter
nichts als Theater
vielleicht schon morgen
ganz und gar nichtig

selbst wenn du eifrig
nach einem Weg suchst
sinkst du nur tiefer
in Dunst und Dunkel
auch nach den Büchern
lebst du nicht richtig

白居易 (772-846):
感悟妄緣,題如上人壁

自從為騃童
直至作衰翁
所好隨年異
為忙終日同
弄沙成佛塔
鏘玉謁王宮
彼此皆兒戲
須臾即色空
有營非了義
無著是真宗
兼恐勤修道
猶應在妄中

Bai Juyi (772-846): Realizing the Futility of Life
[Written on the walls of a priest’s cell, circa 828]

Ever since the time when I was a lusty boy
Down till now when I am ill and old,
The things I have cared for have been different at different times,
But my being busy, that was never changed.
Then on the shore, – building sand-pagodas;
Now, at Court, covered with tinkling jade.
This and that, – equally childish games,
Things whose substance passes in a moment of time!
While the hands are busy, the heart cannot understand;
When there are no Scriptures, then Doctrine is sound.
Even should one zealously strive to learn the Way,
That very striving will make one’s error more.

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 81. Übersetzung Arthur Waley)

Menschen

denken sie nicht ich
meide die Menschen
bisweilen müssen
Menschen schon sein
doch ich genieße
die meisten Freuden
am allerliebsten
für mich allein

You mustn’t suppose
I never mingle in the world
Of humankind –
It’s simply that I prefer
To enjoy myself alone.
(Ryokan 1758-1831)

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 225. Übersetzung Donald Keene)

Lies keine Bücher!

lies keine Bücher
sprich keine Verse
murmle dir nicht das
Blut aus dem Herzen
guck dir die Augen
nicht aus dem Kopf

zirp nicht beim Lesen
wie eine Grille
sonst wirst du kränklich
ältlich und hager
allen nur lästig
ein fader Tropf

besser ist es du
fegst deine Stube
schließt deine Augen
duselst in süßem
Weihrauch am Schreibtisch
machst es dir nett

du hörst dem Wind zu
lauschst leisem Regen
fühlst du dich munter
gehst du spazieren
und bist du müde
gehst du ins Bett

楊萬裡 (1127-1206): 書詩莫吟

書詩莫吟
讀書兩眼枯見骨 吟詩個字嘔出心
人言讀書樂 人言吟詩好
口吻長作秋虫聲 隻令君瘦令君老
君瘦君老且勿論 傍人聽之亦煩惱
何如閉目坐齋房 下帘掃地自焚香
聽風聽雨都有味 健來即行倦來睡

Yang Wanli (1127-1206): Don’t read books!


Don’t read books!
Don’t chant poems!
When you read books your eyeballs wither away
,
leaving the bare sockets.


When you chant poems your heart leaks out slowly
with each word.

People say reading books is enjoyable.

People say chanting poems is fun.
But if your lips constantly make a sound
like an insect chirping in autumn,

you will only turn into a haggard old man.

And even if you don’t turn into a haggard old man,

it’s annoying for others to have to hear you.
It’s so much better

to close your eyes, sit in your study,
lower the curtains, sweep the floor,

burn incense.
It’s beautiful to listen to the wind,

listen to the rain,

take a walk when you feel energetic,

and when you’re tired go to sleep.

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 140. Übersetzung Jonathan Chaves)

Berge im Nebel

von weitem wirken
neblige Berge
Meer und Gezeiten
zweifellos gut
doch wenn du hinkommst
findest du nichts als
Berge im Nebel
Ebbe und Flut


DSC02715


蘇軾 (1037-1101): 廬山煙雨

廬山煙雨浙江潮
未到千般恨不消
到得還來別無事
廬山煙雨浙江潮

Su Shi (1037-1101): Misty Rain at Mount Lu

Misty Rain at Mount Lu and Zhejiang’s tide –
before reaching there, you yearned for them endlessly.
But having arrived, you find there’s nothing else
but misty Rain at Mount Lu and Zhejiang’s tide.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 168.)

Schreibsüchtig

noch als felsgrauer
knorriger Alter
kann ich’s nicht lassen
Reime zu machen
in längst verwelkten
Wörtern zu wühlen
und lauthals über
mich selbst zu lachen

敬安 (1852-1912): 自笑

寒巖枯木一頭陀
結習無如文字何
自笑強書塵世字
卻嗔倉頡誤人多

Jingan (1852-1912):  Laughing at Myself

Cold cliffs, dead trees, and a monk
who, trapped by habit, can’t get rid of written language.
Laughing at himself, he writes the words of the mundane world,
while venting his anger at Cang Jie* for misleading mortals.

*Cang Jie, said to be the Official Historian of the Yellow Emperor an creator of the Chinese Characters.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 117.)

Graues Haar

dagegen helfen
keine Tinkturen
der Herbst kommt trotzdem
am Ende ist Schluss
freu dich dein Haar ist
ein weiches Kissen
hör die Zikaden
und schau auf den Fluss

齊己 (863?-937): 白髮

莫染亦莫鑷
任從伊滿頭
白雖無耐藥
黑也不禁秋
靜枕聽蟬臥
閒垂看水流
浮生未達此
多爲爾爲愁

Qiji (863?-937): White Hair

Do not dye or pluck it –
let it cover your head.
Although there’s no remedy for it’s turning white,
black can withstand autumn no better.
Pillowed on it, one quietly listens to cicadas;
letting it down, idly one watches the flowing stream.
Growing old is unavoidable in this floating life,
but most people grieve because of you, white hair.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 50.)