Kein Wort

allmählich erwacht
der Frühlingsmorgen
ein Wagen poltert
durch die Allee
am fernen Dorfrand
lockt Pfirsichblüte
die Uferweiden
streicheln den See

Goldfische funkeln
Prachtenten paddeln
Flügel an Flügel
einträchtig fort
der Dichter sieht die
friedliche Szene
heiteren Herzens
ohne ein Wort



fische
 

春日正遲遲
遊車驕自許
挑花迎遠村
楊柳拂清渚
魴鯉躍金鱗
鴛鴦交錦羽
詩人縱曠觀
安得竟無語

 

against the gently flowing spring morning
the arrogant rattle of a coach
peach blossoms beckon from the distant village
willow branches caress the shoulder of my pond

as bream and carp flash their golden scales
and mated ducks link embroidered wings
the poet stares about; this way then that –
caught in a web beyond all speaking

Shih-shu could have followed the bustling coach across the plain into town and perhaps encountered a sweet thing or two there. But he would prefer, it seems, to remain faithful to his own hills, his own pond. A light, but perfectly apparent, tincture of eroticism suffuses this poem.

Shi[h]shu / 石樹 (Red Pine / O’Connor, Mike (eds.): The clouds should know me by now: Buddhist poet monks of China. Somerville: Wisdom Publications 2006. 147. englische Übersetzung und Anmerkung: James H. Sanford.)