Tuschebild

Felswände Kiefern
Bambus die Hütte
am Abhang allein
hier übernachten
nur ein paar Wolken
kein Mensch kehrt hier ein

 

inoue_yuichi_bergInoue Yuichi (1916-1985): Berg (山)

敬安 (1852-1912): 題畫

一株二株松
三箇五箇竹
巖扉長寂寥
祇有雲來宿

Jingan (1852-1912): ON A PAINTING

A pine or two,
three or four bamboo,
cliffside cottage, long, solitary, silence.
Only floating clouds come to visit.

(Red Pine / O’Connor, Mike (eds.): The clouds should know me by now: Buddhist poet monks of China. Somerville: Wisdom Publications 2006. 190. englische Übersetzung: J. P. Seaton.)

Kein Wort

allmählich erwacht
der Frühlingsmorgen
ein Wagen poltert
durch die Allee
am fernen Dorfrand
lockt Pfirsichblüte
die Uferweiden
streicheln den See

Goldfische funkeln
Prachtenten paddeln
Flügel an Flügel
einträchtig fort
der Dichter sieht die
friedliche Szene
heiteren Herzens
ohne ein Wort



fische
 

春日正遲遲
遊車驕自許
挑花迎遠村
楊柳拂清渚
魴鯉躍金鱗
鴛鴦交錦羽
詩人縱曠觀
安得竟無語

 

against the gently flowing spring morning
the arrogant rattle of a coach
peach blossoms beckon from the distant village
willow branches caress the shoulder of my pond

as bream and carp flash their golden scales
and mated ducks link embroidered wings
the poet stares about; this way then that –
caught in a web beyond all speaking

Shih-shu could have followed the bustling coach across the plain into town and perhaps encountered a sweet thing or two there. But he would prefer, it seems, to remain faithful to his own hills, his own pond. A light, but perfectly apparent, tincture of eroticism suffuses this poem.

Shi[h]shu / 石樹 (Red Pine / O’Connor, Mike (eds.): The clouds should know me by now: Buddhist poet monks of China. Somerville: Wisdom Publications 2006. 147. englische Übersetzung und Anmerkung: James H. Sanford.)

Versenkung

ich sitze reglos
in weißen Wolken
all meine Sorgen
vergessen verraucht
dann schrecke ich auf
es ist schon Abend
längst ist mein Kissen
in Mondlicht getaucht

敬安 (1852-1912): 出定吟

禪宮寂寂白雲封
枯坐蒲團萬慮空
定起不知天已暮
忽驚身在月明中

Jing’an (1852-1912): Coming out of Samadhi

The heavenly realm of meditation is quiet, sealed by clouds;
I sat long on my rush mat, all worries vanished.
Arising from Samadhi, I didn’t realize that evening has come –
astonished to find myself in bright moonlight.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 115.)

Der faule Ochse

er meidet alle
Wege zum Reisfeld
er fürchtet das Joch
zieht keinen Pflug
und frisst kein süßes
Gras von der Koppel
Seewind und Nebel
sind ihm genug

 

DSC03183Nationalmuseum Tokio

 

無門慧開 (1183–1260): 懶牛

不經南陌與西阡
犁杷年來怕上肩
棄卻欄中肥嫩艸
綠楊堤畔飽風煙

Wumen Huikai (1183–1260): Lazy Ox

Shunning the south and west paths between the rice paddies,
for over a year refusing to drag the plough with his shoulders,
and giving up the thick and tender fodder in the pen,
it feeds on wind and mist along the willow-shaded embankment.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 83.)

Vergebliches Streben

damals als Junge
beim Spielen am Strand
heute als Graukopf
in Amt und Würden
immer war mir das
Tätigsein wichtig

doch wenn die Hand eilt
kümmert die Seele
Sandburg und Ämter
nichts als Theater
vielleicht schon morgen
ganz und gar nichtig

selbst wenn du eifrig
nach einem Weg suchst
sinkst du nur tiefer
in Dunst und Dunkel
auch nach den Büchern
lebst du nicht richtig

白居易 (772-846):
感悟妄緣,題如上人壁

自從為騃童
直至作衰翁
所好隨年異
為忙終日同
弄沙成佛塔
鏘玉謁王宮
彼此皆兒戲
須臾即色空
有營非了義
無著是真宗
兼恐勤修道
猶應在妄中

Bai Juyi (772-846): Realizing the Futility of Life
[Written on the walls of a priest’s cell, circa 828]

Ever since the time when I was a lusty boy
Down till now when I am ill and old,
The things I have cared for have been different at different times,
But my being busy, that was never changed.
Then on the shore, – building sand-pagodas;
Now, at Court, covered with tinkling jade.
This and that, – equally childish games,
Things whose substance passes in a moment of time!
While the hands are busy, the heart cannot understand;
When there are no Scriptures, then Doctrine is sound.
Even should one zealously strive to learn the Way,
That very striving will make one’s error more.

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 81. Übersetzung Arthur Waley)