Tuschebild

Felswände Kiefern
Bambus die Hütte
am Abhang allein
hier übernachten
nur ein paar Wolken
kein Mensch kehrt hier ein

 

inoue_yuichi_bergInoue Yuichi (1916-1985): Berg (山)

敬安 (1852-1912): 題畫

一株二株松
三箇五箇竹
巖扉長寂寥
祇有雲來宿

Jingan (1852-1912): ON A PAINTING

A pine or two,
three or four bamboo,
cliffside cottage, long, solitary, silence.
Only floating clouds come to visit.

(Red Pine / O’Connor, Mike (eds.): The clouds should know me by now: Buddhist poet monks of China. Somerville: Wisdom Publications 2006. 190. englische Übersetzung: J. P. Seaton.)

Kein Wort

allmählich erwacht
der Frühlingsmorgen
ein Wagen poltert
durch die Allee
am fernen Dorfrand
lockt Pfirsichblüte
die Uferweiden
streicheln den See

Goldfische funkeln
Prachtenten paddeln
Flügel an Flügel
einträchtig fort
der Dichter sieht die
friedliche Szene
heiteren Herzens
ohne ein Wort



fische
 

春日正遲遲
遊車驕自許
挑花迎遠村
楊柳拂清渚
魴鯉躍金鱗
鴛鴦交錦羽
詩人縱曠觀
安得竟無語

 

against the gently flowing spring morning
the arrogant rattle of a coach
peach blossoms beckon from the distant village
willow branches caress the shoulder of my pond

as bream and carp flash their golden scales
and mated ducks link embroidered wings
the poet stares about; this way then that –
caught in a web beyond all speaking

Shih-shu could have followed the bustling coach across the plain into town and perhaps encountered a sweet thing or two there. But he would prefer, it seems, to remain faithful to his own hills, his own pond. A light, but perfectly apparent, tincture of eroticism suffuses this poem.

Shi[h]shu / 石樹 (Red Pine / O’Connor, Mike (eds.): The clouds should know me by now: Buddhist poet monks of China. Somerville: Wisdom Publications 2006. 147. englische Übersetzung und Anmerkung: James H. Sanford.)

Versenkung

ich sitze reglos
in weißen Wolken
all meine Sorgen
vergessen verraucht
dann schrecke ich auf
es ist schon Abend
längst ist mein Kissen
in Mondlicht getaucht

敬安 (1852-1912): 出定吟

禪宮寂寂白雲封
枯坐蒲團萬慮空
定起不知天已暮
忽驚身在月明中

Jing’an (1852-1912): Coming out of Samadhi

The heavenly realm of meditation is quiet, sealed by clouds;
I sat long on my rush mat, all worries vanished.
Arising from Samadhi, I didn’t realize that evening has come –
astonished to find myself in bright moonlight.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 115.)

Der faule Ochse

er meidet alle
Wege zum Reisfeld
er fürchtet das Joch
zieht keinen Pflug
und frisst kein süßes
Gras von der Koppel
Seewind und Nebel
sind ihm genug

 

DSC03183Nationalmuseum Tokio

 

無門慧開 (1183–1260): 懶牛

不經南陌與西阡
犁杷年來怕上肩
棄卻欄中肥嫩艸
綠楊堤畔飽風煙

Wumen Huikai (1183–1260): Lazy Ox

Shunning the south and west paths between the rice paddies,
for over a year refusing to drag the plough with his shoulders,
and giving up the thick and tender fodder in the pen,
it feeds on wind and mist along the willow-shaded embankment.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 83.)

Vergebliches Streben

damals als Junge
beim Spielen am Strand
heute als Graukopf
in Amt und Würden
immer war mir das
Tätigsein wichtig

doch wenn die Hand eilt
kümmert die Seele
Sandburg und Ämter
nichts als Theater
vielleicht schon morgen
ganz und gar nichtig

selbst wenn du eifrig
nach einem Weg suchst
sinkst du nur tiefer
in Dunst und Dunkel
auch nach den Büchern
lebst du nicht richtig

白居易 (772-846):
感悟妄緣,題如上人壁

自從為騃童
直至作衰翁
所好隨年異
為忙終日同
弄沙成佛塔
鏘玉謁王宮
彼此皆兒戲
須臾即色空
有營非了義
無著是真宗
兼恐勤修道
猶應在妄中

Bai Juyi (772-846): Realizing the Futility of Life
[Written on the walls of a priest’s cell, circa 828]

Ever since the time when I was a lusty boy
Down till now when I am ill and old,
The things I have cared for have been different at different times,
But my being busy, that was never changed.
Then on the shore, – building sand-pagodas;
Now, at Court, covered with tinkling jade.
This and that, – equally childish games,
Things whose substance passes in a moment of time!
While the hands are busy, the heart cannot understand;
When there are no Scriptures, then Doctrine is sound.
Even should one zealously strive to learn the Way,
That very striving will make one’s error more.

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 81. Übersetzung Arthur Waley)

Menschen

denken sie nicht ich
meide die Menschen
bisweilen müssen
Menschen schon sein
doch ich genieße
die meisten Freuden
am allerliebsten
für mich allein

You mustn’t suppose
I never mingle in the world
Of humankind –
It’s simply that I prefer
To enjoy myself alone.
(Ryokan 1758-1831)

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 225. Übersetzung Donald Keene)

Lies keine Bücher!

lies keine Bücher
sprich keine Verse
murmle dir nicht das
Blut aus dem Herzen
guck dir die Augen
nicht aus dem Kopf

zirp nicht beim Lesen
wie eine Grille
sonst wirst du kränklich
ältlich und hager
allen nur lästig
ein fader Tropf

besser ist es du
fegst deine Stube
schließt deine Augen
duselst in süßem
Weihrauch am Schreibtisch
machst es dir nett

du hörst dem Wind zu
lauschst leisem Regen
fühlst du dich munter
gehst du spazieren
und bist du müde
gehst du ins Bett

楊萬裡 (1127-1206): 書詩莫吟

書詩莫吟
讀書兩眼枯見骨 吟詩個字嘔出心
人言讀書樂 人言吟詩好
口吻長作秋虫聲 隻令君瘦令君老
君瘦君老且勿論 傍人聽之亦煩惱
何如閉目坐齋房 下帘掃地自焚香
聽風聽雨都有味 健來即行倦來睡

Yang Wanli (1127-1206): Don’t read books!


Don’t read books!
Don’t chant poems!
When you read books your eyeballs wither away
,
leaving the bare sockets.


When you chant poems your heart leaks out slowly
with each word.

People say reading books is enjoyable.

People say chanting poems is fun.
But if your lips constantly make a sound
like an insect chirping in autumn,

you will only turn into a haggard old man.

And even if you don’t turn into a haggard old man,

it’s annoying for others to have to hear you.
It’s so much better

to close your eyes, sit in your study,
lower the curtains, sweep the floor,

burn incense.
It’s beautiful to listen to the wind,

listen to the rain,

take a walk when you feel energetic,

and when you’re tired go to sleep.

(Zen Poems. Selected and edited by Peter Harris. New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1999. 140. Übersetzung Jonathan Chaves)

Berge im Nebel

von weitem wirken
neblige Berge
Meer und Gezeiten
zweifellos gut
doch wenn du hinkommst
findest du nichts als
Berge im Nebel
Ebbe und Flut


DSC02715


蘇軾 (1037-1101): 廬山煙雨

廬山煙雨浙江潮
未到千般恨不消
到得還來別無事
廬山煙雨浙江潮

Su Shi (1037-1101): Misty Rain at Mount Lu

Misty Rain at Mount Lu and Zhejiang’s tide –
before reaching there, you yearned for them endlessly.
But having arrived, you find there’s nothing else
but misty Rain at Mount Lu and Zhejiang’s tide.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 168.)

Schreibsüchtig

noch als felsgrauer
knorriger Alter
kann ich’s nicht lassen
Reime zu machen
in längst verwelkten
Wörtern zu wühlen
und lauthals über
mich selbst zu lachen

敬安 (1852-1912): 自笑

寒巖枯木一頭陀
結習無如文字何
自笑強書塵世字
卻嗔倉頡誤人多

Jingan (1852-1912):  Laughing at Myself

Cold cliffs, dead trees, and a monk
who, trapped by habit, can’t get rid of written language.
Laughing at himself, he writes the words of the mundane world,
while venting his anger at Cang Jie* for misleading mortals.

*Cang Jie, said to be the Official Historian of the Yellow Emperor an creator of the Chinese Characters.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 117.)

Graues Haar

dagegen helfen
keine Tinkturen
der Herbst kommt trotzdem
am Ende ist Schluss
freu dich dein Haar ist
ein weiches Kissen
hör die Zikaden
und schau auf den Fluss

齊己 (863?-937): 白髮

莫染亦莫鑷
任從伊滿頭
白雖無耐藥
黑也不禁秋
靜枕聽蟬臥
閒垂看水流
浮生未達此
多爲爾爲愁

Qiji (863?-937): White Hair

Do not dye or pluck it –
let it cover your head.
Although there’s no remedy for it’s turning white,
black can withstand autumn no better.
Pillowed on it, one quietly listens to cicadas;
letting it down, idly one watches the flowing stream.
Growing old is unavoidable in this floating life,
but most people grieve because of you, white hair.

(A Full Load of Moonlight. Chinese Chan Buddhist Poems. Translated by Mary M. J. Fung and David Lunde. Hongkong: Musical Stone Culture 2014. 50.)

Gipfelrast

in weiter Runde
Berge und Wolken
tiefblauer Himmel
mit weißen Streifen
die Welt zu Füßen
welches Vergnügen
jetzt von hier oben
auf sie zu pfeifen

通玄峯頂  不是人間  心外無物  満目青山
am Gipfel des Berges Tungxuan
endet die Menschenwelt

es gibt keine Dinge außer im Herzen
und das Auge ist voll grüner Berge
天台德昭 Tiantai Deshao (891-972)
 

20150916_122325

 

Esel

das Leben ein Dunst
der leise verweht
der Tod ein Mondstrahl
ein flüchtiger Blick
wenn du darüber
zu lange nachdenkst
dann trottest du wie
ein Esel am Strick

Mumon Gensen (japanischer Zen-Mönch, + 1390)

Life is a cloud of mist
Emerging from a mountain cave
And death
A floating moon
In its celestial course.
If you think too much
About the meaning they may have
You’ll be bound forever
Like an ass to a stake.

(Hoffmann, Yoel: Japanese Death Poems. Written by Zen Monks and Haiku Poets on the Verge of Death. Tokyo: Tuttle 1986. 109.)

Ein Vers

grüne Gefilde
Tage und Nächte
Himmel und Erde
kaum zu ermessen
urplötzlich kommt mir
ein Vers in den Sinn
und schon ist alles
andre vergessen

隨绿

山水隨绿好
乾坤日夕寬
偶然成一偈
萬事不相干

(禪詩六百首. 台北: 國家出版社 83/1994. 七七.)

der Landschaft (Bergen und Gewässern) steht das Grün gut
Himmel und Erde und Tag und Nacht sind unermesslich
plötzlich entsteht ein (buddhistischer) Vers
und alles (andere) wird unbedeutend

(Unbekannter Autor. Aus: Sechshundert Zen-Gedichte. Taibei: Guojia Chubanshe 83/1994. 77.)

Wind und Wolken

das sogenannte
Interessante
kann mir inzwischen
gestohlen bleiben
weg mit der Zeitung
ich will mir lieber
von Wind und Wolken
selber was schreiben


Cela ne m’intéresse pas tellement de vivre en faisant des choses intéressantes. Je rêve de m’arrêter, de zigzaguer, de faire de chaque journée une petite vie. Je rêve de contempler mon nombril. J’aimerais prendre des trains pour n’importe où … (Georges Wolinski: Lettre ouverte. In: J’étais un sale phallocrate. Paris: Albin Michel 1979. 55)

Abend im Gebirge

ich schließe meine
windschiefe Pforte
längst hat die Sonne
den Berg verschlungen
die Matte aus Gras
ist grün und weich
mein hölzernes Kissen
ist sanft geschwungen

in dunklen Kiefern
leuchtet der Mond
noch nicht die kleinste
Wolke am Himmel
ich schweife träumend
lang durch die Nacht
meilenweit über
dem Weltgewimmel

紅日半銜山
柴門便掩關
綠蒲眠褥軟
白木枕頭彎
松月來先照
溪雲出未還
迢迢清夜夢
不肯到人間

When the red sun swallows the mountain
I shut my makeshift door
my new grass mattress gives
my lacquered wooden pillow* curves
and when the pine moon shines
before mountain clouds return
clear night dreams go far
but not to the world below

* […] until recently the Chinese preferred to sleep on hard pillows designed to cool the brain. In addition to wood, porcelain was also used.

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 36f.)

Außen und innen

von außen nichts als
ein Spitzdach aus Gras
doch meine Hütte
ist voll von Räumen
für Milliarden
funkelnder Welten
und für ein Kissen
sie zu erträumen

團團一箇尖頭屋
外面誰知裏面寬
世界大千都著了
尚餘閒地放蒲團

Standing outside my pointed-roof hut
how much space do you think is inside
all the worlds of the universe are there
with room to spare for a zazen cushion

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 62f.)

eine runde Hütte mit spitzem Dach
wer weiß von außen schon wie geräumig sie innen ist
sie enthält eine riesige Zahl von Welten
und zusätzlich noch Platz für eine Gebetsmatte / ein Meditationskissen

Ohne Anker

einst unter Kiefern
auf steilen Pfaden
nun alt und kraftlos
mir selbst zum Lachen
heute wie damals
bin ich gelassen
im Strom der Zeit ein
treibender Nachen

拾得: 自笑詩

自笑老夫筯力敗
偏戀鬆岩愛獨游
可嘆往年至今日
任運還同不系舟

Partial to pine cliffs and lonely paths
an old man laughs at himself when he falters
even now after all these years
trusting the current like an unmoored boat
Shide / Shih-te (9. Jhdt.)

(The Poems of Pickup (Shih-te). 拾得詩. In: The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 282f., 27.)

Vogel am Bach

sitzen und träumen
allein im Bergwald
Duftblüten fallen
die Frühlingsnacht still
aufgeht der Goldmond
am Bach im Talgrund
erschrickt ein Vogel
und pfeift einmal schrill

王維 (701-761): 鳥鳴澗

人閒桂花落
夜靜春山空
月出驚山鳥
時鳴春澗中

Wang Wei (701-761): Bird-singing Stream

Man at leisure. Cassia flowers fall.
Quiet night. Spring mountain is empty.
Moon rises. Startles a mountain bird.
It sings at times in the spring stream.

(Yip Wailim: Chinese Poetry. Major Modes and Genres. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. 1976. 306.)

Im Orchideenpavillon

die Büsche am Bach
in voller Blüte
Fischschuppen blitzen
unten im Licht
frohgemut werfe
ich meine Angel
ob einer anbeißt
kümmert mich nicht

王彬之 (ca. 400): 蘭亭

鮮葩映林蒲
游鳞戲清渠
臨川欣投釣
得意豈在魚

Wang Binzhi (ca. 400): Orchid Pavilion

Beaming flowers in the thicket
Sporting fishes [sic] in clear stream.
At the Bank, cast a line
Fully content – fish or no fish.

(Yip Wailim: Chinese Poetry. Major Modes and Genres. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. 1976. 178f.)

Auf dem Gipfel

ringsum Pagoden
bei Sonnenaufgang
krähen die Hähne
wird es auch trüber
vor meinen Augen
treibende Wolken
kümmern mich nicht
ich stehe drüber


gipfel


王安石 (1021-1086): 登飛來峰

飛來山上千尋塔
聞說雞鳴見日升
不畏浮雲遮望眼
自緣身在最高層


Wang Anshi (1021-1086): Besteigung des Feilai-Berges

tausend Pagoden auf dem Feilai-Berg
bei Sonnenaufgang krähen dort die Hähne
es macht nichts aus wenn treibende Wolken die Sicht behindern
wenn man auf dem Gipfel steht

Wolkenherz

die Wolken kommen
ohne zu grübeln
und ohne Sorgen
ziehen sie fort
dein Wolkenherz
kannst du nicht finden
wie einen Schlüssel
das hat keinen Ort

王安石 (1021-1086): 即事二首

雲從無心來
還向無心去
無心無處尋
莫覓無心處


Wang Anshi (1021-1086)

die Wolken kommen aus dem Nicht-Herzen
sie kehren zum Nicht-Herzen zurück
das Nichtherz kannst du nicht an irgendeinem Ort suchen
suche nicht irgendeinen Nicht-Herz-Ort

Der Einsiedler und die Klostermönche

während sie betend
in Weihrauchwolken
Jahre auf ihre
Erleuchtung warten
lebe ich jetzt als
heiterer Buddha
unter dem Strohdach
in meinem Garten


gebirge


盡道凡心非佛性
我言佛性即凡心
工夫只怕無人做
鐵杵磨教作線針

Others say everyday-mind isn’t our buddha nature*
I say our buddha nature is simply everyday-mind
afraid that no one will do any work
they tell us to grind iron rods into needles**

* Buddhists agree that we all possess the potential to become buddhas but differ as to how the realization of buddhahood takes place. While most sects say it is realized in stages and through moral discipline and meditation, the Zen sect prefers the radical approach of Bodhidharma: „If you can find your buddha nature apart from your mortal nature, where is ist? Beyond this nature, there is no buddha“ (The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma: 16-17). Thus, when pointing to the buddha, Zen masters point to the everyday mind.

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 60f.)

** Die chinesische Wendung „磨杵成針 einen Eisenstab zur einer Nadel reiben“ bedeutet allgemein ’sich beharrlich mühen, Schwierigkeiten überwinden, sorgfältig studieren‘; hier insbesondere ‚durch religiöses Streben die Buddhanatur erlangen‘.

Abendliche Rast auf einem Felsblock

mein Geist ein Bergbach
mein Leib ein Wölkchen
welch eine Freude
müßig zu hocken
Dämmerung senkt sich
auf stille Hügel
von ferne läuten
die Tempelglocken

 

高攀龍(1562-1626): 枕石

心同流水淨
身與白雲輕
寂寂深山暮
微聞鐘磬聲

 

Gao Panlong(1562-1626): Rast auf einem Stein

mein Herz ist rein wie fließendes Wasser
mein Körper ist leicht wie eine weiße Wolke
still ist die Abenddämmerung tief in den Bergen
ich höre den leisen Klang der Glocken

Refugium

hier ist man immer
ruhig und geborgen
die Kiefern murmeln
ein sanftes Gedicht
mein Haar ist grau ich
lese und sinne
der Pfad vergessen
zurück will ich nicht

 

qibaishisongAusschnitt aus einem Bild von Qi Baishi (1864-1957)

 

欲得安身處
寒山可長保
微風吹幽松
近聽聲愈好
下有斑白人
喃喃讀黃老
十年歸不得
忘卻來時道

Looking for a refuge
Cold Mountain will keep you safe
a faint wind stirs dark pines
come closer the sound gets better
below them sits a gray-haired man
chanting Taoist texts
ten years unable to return
he forgot the way he came

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 38f., 4)

Einsiedelei

mein Abendbrot sind
die roten Wolken
ich wohne wo die
Menschen nicht sind
geheime Bäche
flüstern und murmeln
die hohen Kiefern
stöhnen im Wind

hier ist es kühl
das Wetter ist rauh
du musst zu Fuß gehn
du kannst nicht fahren
und doch vergisst du
in ein paar Stunden
die Sorgenlast von
einhundert Jahren

 

wolken2

有一餐霞子
其居諱俗遊
論時實蕭爽
在夏亦如秋
幽澗常瀝瀝
高松風颼颼
其中半日坐
忘卻百年愁

A man who lives on rose-coloured clouds
shunned the usual haunts for a home
every season is equally dead
summer is just like fall
a dark stream always babbles
a towering pine wind sighs
sitting here less than one day
he forgets a whole lifetime of sorrow

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 54f., 27)

Selbstgewählte Einsamkeit

am Ostseeufer
hinter den Dünen
krumme Kiefern und
Krähengeschrei
fernab von allem
ziehen die Stunden
die mir noch bleiben
an mir vorbei

 

DSC03871

 

蔔擇幽居地
天臺更莫言
猿啼溪霧冷
嶽色草門連
折葉覆松室
開池引澗泉
已甘休萬事
采蕨度殘年

I chose a secluded place to live
Tientai says it all
gibbons howl and the stream fog is cold
a view of the peak adjoins my rush door
I cut some thatch to roof a pine hut
I made a pool and channeled the spring
glad at last to put everything down
picking ferns I pass the years left

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 88f., 79)

Beim Wein

im Herzen der Stadt
und doch gar nicht hier
ich denke träume
und höre weder
Menschen noch Wagen

ich schreibe Verse
seh Vögel im Wind
und helle Wolken
worin der Sinn liegt
wer kann das sagen

陶淵明: 飲酒

結廬在人境
而無車馬喧
問君何能爾
心遠地自偏
採菊東籬下
悠然見南山
山氣日夕佳
飛鳥相與還
此還有真意
欲辨已忘言

Tao Yuanming (365/772?-425): Drinking Wine

I built my hut on the realm of men
yet I hear no rumble of horse and carriage.
Pray, sir, how can this be true?
When the mind’s far away, your land too is remote.
I pick chrysanthemums by my eastern hedge;
far off I see the southern hills.
How fine the sunset through mountain mists,

and the soaring birds come home together.
There is some real meaning in all of this,

though when I try to grasp it I forget the words.

(Paul Rouzer: http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/at/song/song28.html)

Das Kloster am Zerbrochenen Berg

die höchsten Wipfel
beim alten Kloster
von Morgensonne
golden gefleckt
jenseits des Pfades
die bunte Halle
tief in Bambus und
Blüten versteckt

die Vögel tanzen
über den Bergen
mein Herz ist leer ein
spiegelnder Teich
friedliche Stille
nur aus der Ferne
der Ton der Glocke
schwebend und weich


DSC01393


常建 題破山寺後禪院

清晨入古寺
初日照高林
竹徑通幽處
禪房花木深
山光悅鳥性
潭影空人心
萬籟此都寂
但餘鐘磬音

 

Chang Jian (8. Jhdt.): The Meditation Hall of Po Mountain Temple

In the clear morning one enters this old temple;
the rising sun shines on the tops of the trees.
A bamboo footpath takes one through to a secluded spot;
the meditation room is deep in the flowers and trees.
The mountain light makes the birds joyous;
the reflection in the pool empties a human mind.
Ten thousand sounds here are all silent;
only the sounds of the bells remain.

(eastasiastudent.net/china/classical/chang-jian-tipo-shan-si)

Wasser und Holz

täglich dasselbe
ich bins zufrieden
kein Für kein Wider
kein Gram und kein Stolz
mein Ehrenzeichen
die klaren Berge
mein Zauber ich schleppe
Wasser und Holz

日日事無別
惟吾自偶諧
頭頭非取捨
處處沒張乖
朱紫誰爲號
邱山絶塵埃
神通並妙用
運水及搬柴

龐蘊居士 Pang Yun jushi / 龐居士 Hõ Koji (740-808)

In my daily life there are no other chores than
Those that happen to fall into my hands.
Nothing I choose, nothing reject.
Nowhere is there ado, nowhere a slip.
I have no other emblems of my glory than
The mountains and hills without a spot of dust.
My magical power and spiritual exercise consists in
Carrying water and gathering firewood.
(anonym)

Weiße Hütte

wachsbleicher Himmel
Eiszapfen hängen
von meiner Traufe
in frostige Luft
nachts fällt kein Schnee mehr
durchs Fenster von fern
der Pflaumenblüten
noch zaghafter Duft


DSC02959


白庵
一色虛明含法界
四檐皎潔若冰霜
小窗幾度雪晴夜
不見梅花只覺香

White Hut
The world is surrounded by a one-color sky

my eaves are white as ice
at night through my windows when the snow stops
no sign of plum blossoms only their scent

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 116f.)

Wirklichkeit

in meiner leeren
Hand liegt der Spaten
im Gehen kann ich
den Büffel reiten
ich überquere
den Fluss und sehe
das Wasser ruhen
die Brücke gleiten

 

DSC03452

 

空手把鉏頭
步行騎水牛
人在橋上過
橋流水不流

Fu Dashi (傅大士) (497-569?)

 

Fritz Graßhoff (1913-1997): Auf der Brücke

Auf der Brücke stehn
und ins Wasser sehn,
und der Fluß fließt lautlos seine Bahn.
Lautlos umgekehrt
deine Brücke fährt
auf dem Wasser wie ein Kahn.

Heimlich losgetäut
gleiten Dorf und Leut,
Baum und Kirchturm, Ufersaum und Steg.
Was gebunden war,
macht sich wunderbar
mit dem Träumer auf den Weg.

Mond und Stern am End
und das Firmament,
alles wandert. Nur der Fluß erstarrt.
Stille steht die Zeit,
und die Ewigkeit
mündet in die Gegenwart.

(Aus: Fritz Graßhoff: “Graßhoffs neue große Halunkenpostille”. München: Limes 1980. S. 290.)

Den Kopf freihalten!

Sommerwind Krokus
Schneetreiben Herbstmond
Jahreszeiten
sind nicht so wichtig
denk nicht an tausend
nutzlose Sachen
dadurch lebst du in
jeder Zeit richtig

 

DSC03163

 

春有百花秋有月
夏有涼風冬有雪
若無閑事挂心頭
更是人間好時節

Mindfulness

Spring comes with its flowers, autumn with the moon,
summer with breezes, winter with snow;
when useless things don’t stick in the mind,
that is your best season.

(無門關 Wumenguan)

Saisho-in, Kioto

景勝院, 京都

das langsame Herz
des Bergs der starke
Pulsschlag der Föhren
die ernste Glocke
des Tempels im Tal
hier kaum zu hören

alles ist eines
der Berg die Glocke
Bäume Zikaden
ein weißes Hündchen
der kunstreiche Mönch
auf grünen Pfaden

alles ist kühl unter
turmhohen Wipfeln
hier suchen alle
hier findet jeder
der Ort ist versteckt
und offen zugleich
sein freundlicher Geist
wohnt in der Zeder

 

DSC03455

 

Summer, Saisho-in (anonym)

The evening bell, solemn and bronze,
in the grandfather temple down the hill,
sounds dimly here.

Slow beat of the mountain’s heart, perhaps,
or determined pulse of pine tree (gift of the birds)
growing out of a crotch of the slippery monkey tree.

All one, perhaps –
bell, mountain, tree,
and steady cicada vibrato
and little white dog
and quiet artist-priest, carver of Noh masks,
fashioning a bamboo crutch for the ancient peach tree –
symbol of strength, symbol of concern.

All cool under nodding crowns of the vertical forest,
all seeking in this place,
all finding in this place –
hidden yet open to all –
the spirit in the cedar’s heart.*

Saisho-in: a small, Eighth Century Buddhist temple in a mountain gorge near Kyoto, Japan.

* Japanische Tempel werden zu einem großen Teil aus Zedernholz gebaut.

Einsiedler

unter der Felswand
jenseits der Zeit
die Welt nur im Kopf
ganz still und allein
Halbmond im Fenster
im Herd blasse Glut
im Traum wird er jetzt
ein Schmetterling sein

 

zhuangzi1

 

重巖之下
靜默自居
三際不來
心如境如
斜月半窗
殘火一爐
嗟彼睡夫
蝶夢蓬蓬

„Below high cliffs
serene in solitude
not visited by time
the mind creates the world
the window holds a setting moon
the stove contains a dying fire
pity the sleeping man
startled from his butterfly dream

The last line refers to Chuang-tzu’s story in which he dreams he is a butterfly. On waking, he wonders if he isn‘ a butterfly dreaming he is a man (Chuangtzu 2.11).“

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 90f., II, 7.6. – Bei der Abbildung handelt sich um das Umschlagbild zu: Allinson, Robert E.: Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation. An Analysis of the Inner Chapters. State University of New York Press 1989.)

Unter der Felswand

unter der Felswand
verbrenne ich Laub
hacke und ernte
Korn und Gemüse
mein eigener Koch
ich lebe heiter
heute und für den
Rest meiner Tage
mein Baum welkt und grünt
wie lange wohl noch?

重嚴之下
火種刀耕
有粟有蔬
可煮可烹
了我目前
樂我餘生
坐眄庭柯
幾度衰榮

„Below high cliffs
I slash and burn
there’s vegetables and grain
to boil and steam
to satisfy the present
to brighten old age
looking at a tree in the yard
I count its falls and springs“

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 88f., II, 7.1)

Dem Diener Ling

bei seiner Rückkehr zum Jingci Tempel in Hangzhou

meilenweit Seeglanz
um die sechs Brücken
schau wenn du dort bist
hinauf in die Luft
lauwarmer Wind trägt
Weidensamen und
Vogelnestflusen
im leuchtenden Duft

 

weide

Tanaka Gochikubō (1700-1780): Weide am Ufer (Ausschnitt). Aus: Stiftung Museum Schloss Moyland: Haiku & Haiga. Bedburg-Hau 2006. Seite 49.

 

送凌侍者回淨慈

十里湖光浸六橋
到時須著眼頭高
斷是霧捲楊花落
不是鳥窠吹布毛

„Three miles of lakelight flood the six bridges
when you arrive lift up your eyes
willow fuzz swirls in the dike’s warm breeze
or is it down or silk from the bird nests“

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 110f., 46)

Im Gebirge

kaum Platz zum Schlafen
in meiner Hütte
rings tausend Gipfel
ein Bergdohlennest
der klare Himmel
über den Wolken
mein Blick schweift ins Land
nach Nord Süd Ost West
die Welt ist eine
Blume im Nirgends
Blühen und Welken
nur Täuschung und Schein
die Sonne versinkt
der Wind wird frostig
ich schließe die Tür
und heize mir ein


IF

 

破屋三兩橡
住在天峰上
雲散天宇清
放目聊四望
世界空裡花
起滅皆虛妄
日落山風寒
閉門燒火向

„My broken-down hut isn’t three rafters wide
perched above a thousand peaks
clouds unveil an empty sky
the horizon extends in all directions
the world is a flower in space
its bloom and decay are illusions
after sunset the wind turns cold
I close my door and face the fire“

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 80f., 182)

Der Fischer

vor lauter Büchern
den Weg verfehlen –
das Lied des Fischers
ist Gold dagegen
Abend für Abend
am dämmrigen Fluss
bei Mond und Wolken
oder im Regen

漁父

學道參禪失本心
漁歌一曲價千金
湘江暮雨楚雲月
無限風流夜夜呤

Fisherman – Learning the way, studying Zen, they run afoul of the Buddha’s original mind. One tune from the fisherman is worth a thousand pieces of gold. Rain at dusk on the Hsiang River, the moon among the clouds of Ch’u. Furyu [ländlich schlicht, „romantisch“, schön] without end, night after night singing.
(Ikkyū Sōjun 一休宗純, fl.1394-1481; Text und Übersetzung aus: Arntzen, Sonja Elaine: The Poetry of the Kyōunshū „Crazy Cloud Anthology“ of Ikkyū Sōjun. Diss. University of British Columbia 1979. 208)

Geschäftige Menschen

sie kennen vieles
nur nicht sich selber
sie plappern Phrasen
die zu nichts taugen
ihr Weg bleibt dunkel
wenn sie nur dächten
sähen sie alles
mit Buddhas Augen

 

IF

 

世有多事人
廣學諸知見
不識本真性
與道轉懸遠
若能明實相
豈用陳虛願
一念了自心
開佛之知見

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 124f., 132. In der ersten Zeile habe ich in Übereinstimmung mit anderen Quellen das zweite Zeichen “身” (Druckfehler bei Red Pine?) durch das plausiblere “有” ersetzt.)

auf der Erde gibt es viele umtriebige Menschen
die alle Gesichtspunkte und Theorien ausführlich studiert haben
aber ihre ureigene Natur nicht kennen
und weit vom Weg abkommen
wüßten sie was wirklich ist
hingen sie nicht leeren Träumen nach
ein einziger Gedanke kann dir das Herz öffnen
und dich mit Buddhas Blick sehen lassen

Die schöne Frau Sorgenfrei

sie ritt durch Gärten
und zupfte Blumen
sie pflückte Lotos
aus schwankendem Boot
kniete auf grünen
Bärenfellkissen
und fürchtete doch
das Grab und den Tod

璨璨盧家女
舊來名莫愁
貪乘摘花馬
樂搒採蓮舟
膝坐綠熊席
身披青鳳裘
哀傷百年內
不免歸山丘

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 66f., 46)

die strahlende Madame Lu
die man einst Frau Sorgenfrei nannte
liebte es vom Pferd aus Blumen
und vom Boot aus Lotus zu pflücken
sie kniete auf einem grünen Bärenfell
trug ein blaues Phönixkleid
und grämte sich dass sie binnen hundert Jahren
unweigerlich in einem Grab in den Hügeln enden würde

Der Funke

dein Pfeil kann sieben
Bretter durcheilen
du liest mit einem
Blick gleich fünf Zeilen

du hast ein Sofa
aus Elfenbein
du schläfst auf einem
Tigerkopf ein

du bist beliebt und
umfassend gelehrt
fehlt dir der Funke
ist alles nichts wert


tigerkissen

 

精神殊爽爽
形貌極堂堂
能射穿七札
讀書覽五行
經眠虎頭枕
昔坐象牙床
若無阿堵物
不啻冷如霜

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 160f., 182)

dein Kopf ist einzigartig klar
deine Erscheinung ist großartig
du kannst durch sieben Bretter schießen
du liest fünf Zeilen auf einmal
du schläfst auf einem Tigerkopfkissen [aus Jade]
du sitzt auf einem Elfenbeinsofa
wenn du das Wie-soll-man-sagen nicht hast
bist du kalt wie Eis

Der Geist der Täuschung

in Kleidern aus den
Blumen des Himmels
und feinen Schuhen
aus Schildkrötenhaar
schießen sie mit der
Hasenhornarmbrust
den Geist der Täuschung
von ihrem Altar

身着空花衣
足蹑龟毛履
手把兔角弓
拟射无明鬼

„Sky flowers, tortoise hair, and rabbit horns are Buddhist metaphors for the illusory nature of phenomena: people with cataracts see flowers in the sky; people with wild imaginations see hair on a tortoise; and people with dim vision mistake a rabbit’s ears for horns. Cold Mountain is poking fun at those who try to free themselves of delusion by turning their practice into another delusion.“ (Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 246f., 293)

die Körper sind in Himmelsblumenkleider gehüllt
die Füße trippeln in Schildkrötenhaarschuhen
Bögen aus Hasenhorn fest in den Händen
wollen sie allen Ernstes auf die Geister der Verblendung schießen

Zeitgenossen

Tag und Nacht sind sie
schrecklich geschäftig
bauen und ackern
wie angestochen
bis gar nichts mehr geht
übrig bleibt schließlich
auf einem Friedhof
ein Häufchen Knochen


DSCF0051

我見時人日夜忙
廣營屋宅置田莊
到頭一事將不去
獨有骷髏葬北邙

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 68f., 167)

ich sehe meine Zeitgenossen Tag und Nacht beschäftigt
ihre Häuser zu vergrößern und ihre Felder zu beackern
am Ende geht gar nichts mehr
und sie haben nur noch Knochen und ihren Schädel im Grab auf dem Friedhof Beimang

Das Bild zeigt einen Urnenfriedhof in der Nähe des Ma On Shan (馬鞍山) in Hongkong.

Herbst im Gebirge

tagsüber seh ich
Kälbern beim Spiel zu
die Nacht dagegen
verbring ich allein
glitzert der Tau am
Strohdach im Mondlicht
saufe ich selig
Gedichte und Wein

 

china leser

 

滿卷才子詩
溢壺聖人酒
行愛觀牛犢
坐不離左右
霜露入茅檐
月華明瓦牖
此時吸兩甌
吟詩三兩首

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 108f., 107)

meine Bücher sind voll von Gedichten hervorragender Dichter
meine Kanne ist mit gutem Wein gefüllt
unterwegs sehe ich gern den Büffelkälbern zu
zu Hause beschränke ich mich
wenn [im Oktober] der kalte Tau von meinem Dach tropft
und der Mond auf meine Fensterbank scheint
trinke ich ein paar Schalen
und rezitiere zwei drei [andere Quelle: fünfhundert] Gedichte

Junge Frau im Frühling

sie steckt sich Blumen
vom Wegrand ins Haar
aber sie lächelt
niemanden an
flüchtig träumt sie von
süßerer Liebe
und eilt nach Hause
zu ihrem Mann

洛陽多女兒
春日逞華麗
共折路邊花
各持插高髻
髻高花匼匝*
人見皆睥睨
別求掺掺憐
將歸見夫婿

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 78f., 63)

in Luoyang zeigen viele junge Frauen
im Frühling ihre Schönheit
miteinander pflücken sie am Wegrand Blumen
und stecken sie in ihre Hochfrisuren
die Blumen winden sich um ihr hochgetürmtes Haar
spricht sie ein Mann an schlagen sie die Augen nieder
(A) sie suchen zärtlichere Liebe oder sie denken an ihre Gatten zu Hause (Red Pine: „looking elsewhere for a gentler love or thinking of husbands at home“) (B) sie suchen nicht Schmeicheleien sondern kehren zurück nach Hause zu ihren Gatten (hi.baidu.com/chiayewli/item/04390594f4b9d532326eeb7b: „这些妇女们,不要追求这些一点一滴片、赞美,为什么回家,好好的面对自己的夫婿呢? Die Frauen wollen nicht all diese anzüglichen Schmeicheleien und Komplimente; warum nicht nach Hause gehen und brav mit ihren Gatten zusammensein?“) (C) Sie träumen von zärtlicherer Liebe anderswo kehren aber dann nach Hause zu ihren Gatten zurück.

* Bei Red Pine finden sich hier zwei andere, wenig gebräuchliche Schriftzeichen [ge2za1] mit ähnlicher Bedeutung.

Welt im Kopf

nach Sommerregen
glänzende Steine
bemooste Stämme
uralter Bäume
außen sehen wir
alle dasselbe
innen träumt jeder
eigene Träume


DSC03527


一片無塵新雨地
半邊有蘚古時松
目前景物人皆見
取用誰知各不同

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 46f., 99)

[Buddhistischer Konstruktivismus]
ein Stück Boden ohne Staub gleich nach dem Regen
eine alte Kiefer halb [auf der Wetterseite] bemoost
solche Szenen haben alle Menschen in gleicher Weise vor Augen
wer weiß wie jeder seinen eigenen Gebrauch davon macht

Bescheidene Bleibe

ringsum Gebirge
die Hütte winzig
das Bambusbett schmal
noch nicht einmal für
ein müdes Wölkchen
ist Platz zum Schlafen
drum schließ ich bevor
es Nacht wird die Tür

茅屋低低三兩閒
團團環遶盡青山
竹床不許閒雲宿
日未斜時便掩關

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 46f., 97)

die niedrige Hütte ist knapp drei Strohmatten breit
ringsum überall nur grüne Berge
auf dem Bambusbett kann keine müßige Wolke übernachten
wenn die Sonne noch nicht untergegangen ist schließe ich die Tür

Der Kranich

kein Mensch nur Berge
Wildnis und Kiefern
Herbstlaub die Hänge
schon abendlich grau
ein Kranich schwingt sich
auf in den Vollmond
der schwankende Ast
bestäubt mich mit Tau

重巖之下
草莽日交
人影不來
黃葉飄飄
谷鳥晚啼
山月夜高
松露鶴飛
濕我禪袍

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 88f., 7.3)

unter hohen Felswänden
sind Pflanzen meine Begleiter
von Menschen keine Spur
gelbe Blätter treiben vorbei
abends rufen Vögel im Tal
nachts steigt der Bergmond in die Höhe
von einer Kiefer schwingt sich ein Kranich
und stäubt Tau auf meine Kutte

Kein Ufer

wohin du auch blickst
ringsum weißer Dunst
Süd Nord Ost und West
nicht auszumachen
suchst du Erleuchtung
musst du nicht rudern
dreh dich nur um und
steig in den Nachen

無岸

舉頭四望白瀰瀰
南北東西竟莫知
不用篙篙撐到底
回頭便是上船時

„The Dharma is often likened to a raft that can be used to reach the far shore of liberation. But why exhaust yourself poling or rowing across when there’s a favorable wind?“ (The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 114f., 57)

wenn du den Kopf hebst rings nur weißer Dunst
nicht zu erkennen wo Süden Norden Osten oder Westen ist
du musst dich nicht ans Ziel hinüberstaken
wende deinen Kopf und schon ist es Zeit ins Boot zu steigen

Zwischen Himmel und Erde

Bestien die für
Fraß und Klamotten
gierig einander
den Hals umdrehen
ach sie begreifen
die Welt so wenig
wie Blinde das Weiß
der Milch verstehen

天高高不窮
地厚厚無極
動物在其中
憑兹造化力
争頭覓飽暖
作計相噉食
因果都未詳
盲兒問乳色

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 98f., 92)

der Himmel ist unendlich hoch
die Erde ist unauslotbar tief
dazwischen existieren die Lebewesen
sie sind abhängig von den Kräften der Natur
sie schlagen sich die Köpfe ein im Kampf um Nahrung und Kleidung
sie planen sich gegenseitig aufzufressen
sie sind unfähig die Welt zu verstehen
wie Blinde die nach der Farbe der Milch fragen

Herbstnacht

ich bin allein in
Stille und Dunkel
kein Ding kann jetzt mein
Herz mehr bewegen
wenn sich der Wind legt
werd ich dem Mondlicht
das Laub vor der Tür
beiseite fegen

 

DSC02848

獨坐窮心寂杳冥
箇中無法可當情
西風吹盡擁門葉
留得空階與月明

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 66f., 157)

ich sitze leeren Herzens allein in Stille und Dämmerung
wo mich keine Gedanken und keine Gefühle überkommen
wenn der Westwind abgeflaut ist fege ich die Blätter vor meiner Tür
und mache die Stufen frei für das Mondlicht

Einöde

in Muße lebst du
ein langes Leben
die Stille nimmt dir
Sorgen und Wut
im grünen Wasser
spiegeln sich Berge
Schneeflocken tanzen
über der Glut

百千日月閒中度
八萬塵勞靜處消
綠水光中山影轉
紅爐焰上雪花飄

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 48f., 105)

hundert Lebensjahre gehen vorüber wenn man Muße hat
in der Stille verschwinden tausend weltliche Sorgen
das Spiegelbild eines Berges glänzt im grünen Wasser
über den roten Flammen des Ofens wirbeln Schneeflocken

Meine Gedichte

die Dummen rümpfen
kritisch die Nasen
der Durchschnitt wittert
wichtige Sachen
und nur die Besten
werden nicht zögern
über die Verse
herzhaft zu lachen

下愚讀我詩
不解卻嗤誚
中庸讀我詩
思量云甚要
上賢讀我詩
把著滿面笑
楊修見幼婦
一覽便知妙

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 132f., 144)

wenn Dumme meine Gedichte lesen
verstehen sie nichts und rümpfen ablehnend die Nasen
wenn durchschnittliche Menschen meine Gedichte lesen
halten sie sie nach einigem Nachdenken für bedeutend
wenn Begabte meine Gedichte lesen
lachen sie sogleich über das ganze Gesicht
[als Yang Xiu „junge Frau“ las
genügte ein Blick und er verstand „wunderbar“]

[Die letzten beiden Zeilen sind nur mit recht speziellem Hintergrundwissen über ein Sprachspiel mit Schriftzeichen und ihren Bedeutungen verständlich und bleiben deshalb unberücksichtigt: Yang Xiu (175–219), der Berater des kaiserlichen Kanzlers Cao Cao, soll spontan eine rätselhafte Inschrift entschlüsselt haben, in der mit den beiden Zeichen 幼婦 (junge Frau) in zwei Schritten das Zeichen 妙 (wunderbar) angedeutet wird: 1. 幼婦 (junge Frau) ist ein Synonym für 少女 (junge Frau). 2. Die Kombination der beiden Zeichen 女 (Frau) und 少 (jung) zu einem Zeichen ergibt 妙 (wunderbar): 幼婦 –> 少女 –> 妙.]

wu wei

(無爲)

wallenden Nebel
kann man nicht schieben
der geht und verweht
schon von alleine
wer umtriebig strebt
ist bald zerrieben
sieh da die Sonne
scheint auf die Steine

黑霧濃雲撥不開
忽然去了忽然來
任他伎倆自磨滅
紅日依前照石臺

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 56f., 126)

dunkle Nebel und dichte Wolken kann man nicht wegschieben
die gehen plötzlich und kommen plötzlich
die Übereifrigen reiben sich selbst auf
jetzt scheint die rote Sonne wieder wie zuvor auf die Felsen

Gegenwart

vorbei ist vorbei
an das was noch kommt
jetzt schon zu denken
werd ich mich hüten
heute ist wichtig
die Pflaumen sind reif
und am Jasminstrauch
duften die Blüten

過去事已過去了
未來不必預思量
只今便道即今句
梅子熟時梔子香

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 44f., 89)

was vorbei ist ist vorüber
über das was kommt muss man nicht grübeln
aber hier ist ein Vers für heute
die Pflaumen sind reif und der Jasmin duftet

Einsiedlerleben

ich lebe glücklich
in meiner Hütte
muss mich mit Sorgen
nicht weiter quälen
erst trinke ich Tee
dann sitz ich am See
auf Felsen um die
Fische zu zählen

長年心裏渾無事
每日菴中樂有餘
飯罷濃煎茶喫了
池邊坐石數游魚

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 54f., 118)

das ganze Jahr ist mein Herz gelassen und ohne Sorgen
jeden Tag habe ich reichlich Freude in meiner Hütte
nach einer Mahlzeit und einem starken Tee
sitze ich am Teich auf einem Felsen und zähle die Fische

In der Bambushütte

rot steigt die Sonne
über die Berge
nichts treibt mich Alten
schon aufzustehen
ich schlafe weiter
während im Mörser
Ameisen ihre
Pflichtrunden drehen
moerser8

團團紅日上青山
竹屋柴門尚閉關
白髮老僧眠未起
勞生磨蟻正循環

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 64f., 148: „The image of ants marching around the inside of a stone mortar was made famous as a simile for the movement of astronomical bodies […]. They reminded Stonehouse of his fellow humans working their various treadmills.“)

über den grünen Bergen geht die runde rote Sonne auf
die Tür der bescheidenen Bambushütte bleibt geschlossen
der weißhaarige alte Mönch schläft und steht nicht auf
die fleißigen Ameisen beginnen ihre Runden im Mörser

Bergkloster

Schattenzweige und
Vollmond im Fenster
ein Mönch kniet reglos
als atme er nicht
nach Mitternacht stürzt
ein Falter in die
Lampe beim Buddha
und löscht deren Licht

半窗松影半窗月
一箇蒲團一箇僧
盤膝坐來中夜後
飛蛾撲滅佛前燈

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 52f., 117)

das halbe Fenster der Schatten der Kiefer das halbe Fenster der Mond
ein Kissen ein Mönch die Beine verschränkt
nach Mitternacht fliegt eine Motte
und löscht die Lampe vor dem Buddha

buddha xiamen

Lebenskampf

wie sie verbissen
streben und streiten
und doch nur dem Grab
entgegenhetzen
ich möchte lieber
den Weltverächtern
als jenen Kämpfern
ein Denkmal setzen

我見世間人
個個爭意氣
一朝忽然死
只得一片地
闊四尺
長丈二
汝若會出來爭意氣
我與汝
立碑記

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 256f., 306)

ich sehe die Menschen auf der Welt
wie sie alle verbissen kämpfen
eines Tages sterben sie plötzlich
und bekommen nur noch ein kleines Grundstück
vier Fuß breit
acht Fuß lang
wenn du dich diesem verbissenen Kampf entziehen kannst
setze ich dir ein Denkmal

Leeres Herz

unter den Kiefern
die Hütte aus Stroh
ringsum sind Fenster
überall Licht
ich blicke nur in
die grünen Berge
an etwas andres
denke ich nicht

草菴盤結長松下
面面幹窗盡豁開
目對青山終日坐
更無一事上心來

(The Zen Works of Stonehouse. Poems and Talks of a 14th-Century Chinese Hermit. Translated by Red Pine. Berkeley 1999. 62f., 146)


grueneberge


unter hohen Kiefern habe ich eine Hütte gebaut
nach allen Seiten öffnen sich Fenster
den ganzen Tag sitze ich und blicke auf die grünen Berge
darüber hinaus kommt mir nichts in den Sinn

Lesen

Lesen macht uns nicht
weniger kläglich
Lesen hilft nicht dem
Tod zu entwischen
warum dann lesen?
Lesen kann trösten
Bitteres soll man
mit Knoblauch mischen

讀書豈免死
讀書豈免貧
何以好識子
識子勝他人
丈夫不識字
何處可安身
黃連搵蒜醬
忘計是苦辛

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 172f., 201)

Lesen rettet uns nicht vor dem Tod
Lesen befreit uns nicht von der Armut
warum also diese Liebe zur Literatur?
Literatur gibt uns einen Vorsprung vor den andern
wer nicht lesen kann
findet nie Ruhe
press Knoblauch in deinen Krähenfuß
und du vergisst die Bitternis

Ein kluger Mann

der Kerl ist brillant
liest schwieriges Zeug
schreibt hochpräzise
und denkt solide
ein Ausnahmekopf
ein Überflieger
und doch sieht er nichts
nur Unterschiede

世有聰明士
攻苦探幽文
三端自孤立
六藝越諸君
神氣卓然異
精彩超眾群
不識個中意
逐境亂紛紛

(Han Shan, fl. 730-850. The collected songs of Cold Mountain / translated by Red Pine. Port Townsend, Washington 2000. 106f., 105)

da ist ein kluger Mann
er brütet über schwierigen Texten
seine drei Spitzen* sind einzigartig
seine sechs Künste** sind hervorragend
sein Geist ist allen weit überlegen
seine Qualitäten übersteigen die der meisten
aber er verfehlt den Sinn der Dinge
und verliert sich in feinen Unterscheidungen

* Schwert, Pinsel, Zunge  ** Ritual, Musik, Bogenschießen, Wagenlenken, Schreiben, Mathematik

Einsiedlerlied

(anonyme Inschrift auf High West 西高山, Hongkong)

die grünen Berge
sind meine Heimat
ich döse unter
flüsternden Bäumen
zahl keine Miete
und kann getrost von
Pflaumenblüten und
Frühlingswind träumen

 

DSCF0020a

 

Und ist das nicht wirklich schön: (die Vorstellung), Du strolchst über ziemlich einsame direkte Gebirgspfade und auf einmal rechts neben Dir an die Felswand gemalt, liest Du ein Gedicht? (Ist doch viel besser und intensiver als ein Verkehrszeichen!) (Rolf Dieter Brinkmann: Briefe an Hartmut. 1975)

Anleitung zur Meditation

indische Mantras
musst du nicht murmeln
Weihrauchgefäße
musst du nicht schwenken
du musst ein Nichtsnutz
werden und wagen
hellwach zu sein und
gar nichts zu denken


Ei, for was brauch isch dann Selbsterkenntnis? Isch wooß doch, was isch an mer hab! – Frau Siebenhals in der Fernsehserie „Die Firma Hesselbach“, HR 23.12.1960

Verschneiter Fluss

in hundert Bergen
fliegt nicht ein Vogel
auf tausend Pfaden
keines Menschen Spur
im Schnee still ein Boot
ein Greis mit Strohhut
zwischen den Schollen
seine Angelschnur

柳宗元: 江雪

千山鳥飛絕
萬徑人蹤滅
孤舟簑笠翁
獨釣寒江雪

(Liu Zongyuan, 773 bis 819 n. Chr.)

Lob der Einfalt*

Menschlein sei nicht so beflissen
musst doch gar nicht alles wissen
musst nicht jeden Dreck behalten
musst nicht alles selbst gestalten
musst nicht alles registrieren
zählen ordnen kritisieren

darfst dich ab und zu auch lösen
ziellos schweben träumen dösen
albern über Ernstes lachen
dich sogar zum Narren machen
und so darf auch dieser Reim
ruhig unvollkommen bleim

*auf das chinesische Sprichwort „nan de hutu:  Es ist schwer, Einfalt zu erlangen.“